Dementia: Credit Where It’s Due

Image result for Credit Where It's Due pictureOur social worker continues to provide sound support and guidance as this unforgiving journey continues.  I am pleased that Maureen recognises his contribution to our welfare as noted in Girl Friday’s log:

‘Maureen happy that the social worker came to see her.  She likes that he comes to check on her.’

I’m hoping that I have set the scene for a positive reaction to two new faces this week.  Maureen’s Care Coordinator will be making her initial visit this afternoon and I’m hoping that she gets off to a good start.  Her involvement could lead to all sorts of outcomes that could have a positive impact on our lives.

On Thursday the Manager of the Home Treatment Team will be here to assess how we are doing.  It is reassuring that she wants to see us when things are going relatively well, rather than responding to our call when we are in crisis.

We are very fortunate that professional staff in this area are person-centred and are prepared to adopt a progressive approach to supporting carers and their loved ones.  The usual story with vascular dementia is a discharge from the Memory Service unless you are on medication: Maureen declined the offer of antidepressants quite some time ago.  I remember vividly her response to this offer: ‘why do I need those things when you can help me’.  She had witnessed her husband escape from a lifetime on mirtazapine with the support of a therapist and knew of Irving Kirsch’s expose of the misinformation peddled by the drug companies.

One further example where credit is due: a new carer at the weekend immediately hit it off with Maureen.  To hear them preparing vegetables for the Sunday lunch to the Sound of Music yesterday would have made an excellent recording.  I know I’m biased but Maureen would give Julie Andrews a run for her money any day.  A little bird told me that my wife had a soft spot for Christopher Plummer earlier in her life: a sign of a misspent youth perhaps?

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About Remember Me

I am a retired adult educator. My wife had a stroke in February 2014 and now has mixed dementia. Her recovery from stroke has been exceptional apart from 50% loss of peripheral vision and vascular damage. 'Dharma For Dementia' is my approach to being Maureem's Care Partner: it aims to end the suffering of 'Prescribed Disengagement' (Swaffer) .
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6 Responses to Dementia: Credit Where It’s Due

  1. Mary Smith says:

    Glad you have god support from social care. I only met dad’s social worker once in all the years he was ‘on the books’. She never once met dad and on the one occasion I met with her it was clear she hadn’t even read the case notes. The Care Co-ordinator, in the other hand, was fantastically supportive and always ready to listen.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Remember Me says:

    Mary, I’m optimistic that things can only get better from now on. Although it is always dangerous to count your chickens with dementia around.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. AmazingSusan says:

    drug BS is everywhere 😦

    Liked by 1 person

  4. dbb34 says:

    So. Pleased to read your post. Great that Maureen likes these people. It is to the benefit of everyone to keep Maureen at home with you. In order to do this they need to be onboard to provide you with the help and support required. Let’s hope the going progresses more smoothly for you

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Remember Me says:

    I’m not sure she likes them all Di as she remains very cautious about opening up to newbies. However, I think her first meeting with her Care Coordinator went as well as could be expected: lots of confabulation of course!. Why on earth would Maureen open up to people who have the capacity to take away her liberty?

    Like

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