Dementia: Bad Hair Day With Excellent Late Night Show

Yesterday was a game of two halves, to use a football analogy.  Maureen didn’t find it easy early doors but came into her own, as the match went on.

Shortly after kick off, things seemed to be going well.  Maureen arrived downstairs as Gail our carer arrived.  She greeted her like a long lost friend that she hadn’t seen for ages.  Obviously no recollection of the previous week when she was telling Gail we didn’t need carers any longer.

Following my ‘cunning plan’ Gail went out on a shopping mission.  Maureen and I had  breakfast together and things seemed to be on schedule.  When Gail returned Maureen helped with putting the shopping away.

Lunch went ahead as normal, with Maureen displaying a healthy appetite.  She sang along to Christmas Carols as she munched away on another one of my Italian creations.  Once again I scored well for my efforts: particularly on a rather delicious sweet; with ice cream of course.   Following lunch we moved into siesta mode with Maureen managing an hour on the sofa.  When she awoke there was a hint that the hairdressing appointment was a bridge too far.

After around half an hour of upset I encourage Maureen to abandon the trip to let Mark shorten her hair.  The prospect of sitting in a hairdresser’s chair just wasn’t palatable for Maureen on this occasion.  At my suggestion she took to her bed with the only clothes that felt comfortable – her P J’s.  Once again all clothing was too tight and causing distress.

Maureen’s performance in the evening would have got her a ‘Woman of the Match’ award.  Once she had slept for an hour or so in bed, a different player emerged from the tunnel.  She was great company at the tea table singing along, once again, to anything the resident D J put on the deck.  Following tea she accompanied me on a short trip around Tesco and coped well.  On our return she held her own in conversation with two sets of neighbours in the street.

As the match (evening) was drawing to a close she put in a sterling performance.  She searched for her new specs and eventually seemed settled with using her distance glasses to watch T V – quite amazing after the difficulties at the opticians on Monday.

What will today bring?  I have no idea!  Maureen has woken early with a heavy cold.  She may go to see her G P: she may not.  All I can do is try to minimise distress and capitalise upon opportunities for cognitive stimulation.  It makes for an interesting life!

 

 

 

 

 

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About Remember Me

I am a retired adult educator. My wife had a stroke in February 2014 and now has mixed dementia. Her recovery from stroke has been exceptional apart from 50% loss of peripheral vision and vascular damage. 'Dharma For Dementia' is my approach to being Maureem's Care Partner: it aims to end the suffering of 'Prescribed Disengagement' (Swaffer) .
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